Three examples of planned wonkiness at an exhibition

So, I promised a bit of philosophy along with how I got to this point in my artistic safari.  I knew even in my woodcarving that I needed to figure out what art meant to me if I was going to actually produce art and not just pottery.  To me pottery is the making of conventional and functional pots for eating and drinking and storing stuff mainly.  Making beautiful pottery is noble and art in itself I guess but I sort of differentiate between a work of art and a nice piece of pottery.  I do both but I like art better.  I read somewhere that our eye is trained to the perfect in modern times.  So much stuff comes from molds or machines nowadays that when we look at something it is nearly always perfect.  We pretty much expect it and when we look at something and it isn't perfect we notice it right away. I have heard potters and collectors say its wonky when looking at a pot.  Meaning something is not quite right with it.  I don't think an art piece should be sloppily made or lacking in technique but I do think that ceramic art should look like it has the touch of the artist's hand.  Bumps, odd shapes, holes and the like should differentiate a pot from the mundanely perfect.  As some potters say with tongue in cheek, you want perfect go to Walmart.   And so you will see in my work intentional wonkiness which I hope is in balance to the extent that you can perceive it as attractive or at least interesting.

PENLAND WORKSHOPS WITH

RONAN PETERSON

MEREDITH HOST

CHRIS GUSTIN

KIP O'KRONGLY

I LOVE THE SMELL OF WOOD BURNING IN THE MORNING